Use Of English: Common versus Come On!

I have also observed that the word “common” is wrongly used in place of the phrase “come on”. The mix up usually goes this way: “Common! Sit down there!” However, that is incorrect usage. Common is used to refer to something that occurs, appears or is used frequently. Example of correct usage: “That is a common car.” In other words, the car is seen frequently. Come on, however, is used as an interjection to stop…

"Use Of English: Common versus Come On!"

Use Of English: Been versus Being

Two words that get regularly mixed up in everyday use of English are “been” and “being”. Let’s have a look at how each should be used. Been: This is the past participle of be. Examples of correct usage: You have been a good boy. The country has been in chaos since the last elections. The story has been proved to be false. The car had been stolen months ago. It has been a good day…

"Use Of English: Been versus Being"

Use of English: None versus Neither

Neither is used when you are referring to two options. None is used when you are referring to many options. Incorrect: “None of the two political parties care if Nigerians survive or not.” Correct: “Neither of the two political parties cares if Nigerians survive or not.” Correct: “None of the boys in the class are good dancers.” Don’t forget: neither is for two options none is for multiple options Thank you for joining me again…

"Use of English: None versus Neither"

Use of English: “Am” is not the same as “I’m”

Question: What is your name? Answer: I am Yomi Alternative answer: I’m Yomi Incorrect answer: Am Yomi The word “I’m” is short for “I am”. If you want to use “am” in any context, the one-letter word “I” must precede it. Examples: I am on my way. (Am on my way is incorrect) I am fine (Am fine is incorrect) You can correctly substitute “I am” with I’m. Examples: I’m on my way (Am on…

"Use of English: “Am” is not the same as “I’m”"

Use of English: The difference between Advice and Advise

Advice is a noun. It means a recommendation or suggestion. You use it when you have to refer to a recommendation. Examples: His advice to the boy is quite sound Are you open to good advice? We all love to give advice Good advice there! Advise, on the other hand, is a verb that means “to give advice”. It is a “doing” or “action” word. You use it when you or someone else is making…

"Use of English: The difference between Advice and Advise"